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Conservation Heroes Series Talk - Tatyana Humle (DICE)

When

17 March 2016 (Thu)
7:00 -

Where

Gallery 6- Powell-Cotton Museum

Contact

01843 842168 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Conservation Heroes Series Talk - Tatyana Humle (DICE)

Dr. Tatyana Humle, Senior Lecturer in Primate Conservation, from the University of Kent at Canterbury (DICE) School of Anthropology and Conservation

£4 per person, members FREE

Planet of the Apes: Can People and Chimpanzees Co-exist?

For the first talk in our Conservation Heroes Series Talks, Dr. Tatyana Humle, Senior Lecturer in Primate Conservation, from the University of Kent at Canterbury (DICE) School of Anthropology and Conservation will be joining us. 

Countries such as Guinea and Sierra Leone are not only home to some of the largest remaining populations of the endangered West African subspecies of chimpanzee, but also host vast numbers of native wild or feral oil palm  and areas of land sought after for large scale oil palm industrial development. The oil palm often acts as a prime resource for both humans and chimpanzees across vast mosaics of fallow areas, cultivated fields, riverine areas, forest fragments and human settlements. Since the majority of chimpanzees in both these countries occur outside protected areas, many chimpanzee populations rely on the oil palm, as well as possibly human cultivars, for their subsistence. Such landscapes have in some cases sustained human-chimpanzee co-existence for generations; however, more recent rapid changes in landscape structure and use are posing new challenges and fuelling increased intolerance towards chimpanzees and other wildlife. Much of my research centres on understanding how human and chimpanzee behaviour, perceptions and culture influence their ability to share a same landscape and on assessing the main challenges to people’s tolerance towards wildlife. The case of the oil palm illustrates perfectly the complexities of co-existence and the challenges that lie ahead for biodiversity conservation and development. There is great deal of variation in how and where chimpanzees use the wild or feral oil palm for nesting and/or for feeding purposes, while the oil palm provides humans with numerous products of immense domestic and commercial value. It is essential for us to understand these patterns of use and evaluate the oil palm’s contribution to the persistence of chimpanzees and other wildlife and local peoples’ livelihoods. Such work could help shape sustainable land use management and economic development on both a local and national scale, concurrent with an agenda of co-existence rather than one risking fuelling intolerance and conflict. Unfortunately, the challenge is great; the number of chimpanzee orphans coming into chimpanzee rehabilitation centres such as the Tacugama Chimpanzee Sanctuary in Sierra Leone and the Chimpanzee Conservation Center in Guinea have increased in recent years This situation does raise major concerns about law enforcement and governance and also inevitably elicit a necessary debate into the links between species conservation and welfare. 

For more information:

http://www.kent.ac.uk/dice/

http://www.projetprimates.com/en/

http://www.tacugama.com/

LOCATION:   
Gallery 6- Powell-Cotton Museum

CONTACT DETAILS:
01843 842168 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

To visit the original event page, please click here

£4 per person, or FREE for members

 

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